Purple is in!

LUXE TRENDS 11 2009  (Purple is In)

 Lee Ann Miller Team Logo w/Tate

704-896-5141 Office

www.LeeAnnMiller.com

 

Charlotte Area Shopping Centers

Ayrsley     NC 49 at I-485     Charlotte, NC  28273     704-643-4148     www.ayrsley.com     Baxter Town Center & Village Shops    1030 Assembly Drive    Fort Mill, SC 29708    877-570-4663    www.villageofbaxter.com    Birkdale Village    8712 Townley Road    Huntersville, NC 28078    704-895-8744    www.birkdalevillage.net    Carolina Place Mall    11025 Carolina Place Parkway    Pineville, NC 28134    704-543-9300    www.carolinaplace.com    Concord Mills    8111 Concord Mills Boulevard    Concord, NC 28207    704-979-5000    www.concordmills.com      Hickory Furniture Mart     2220 Hwy 70 SE    Hickory, NC 28602    800-462-6278   www.hickoryfurniture.com  Monroe Mall    2115 W. Roosevelt Boulevard    Monroe, NC 28110    704-289-6547 www.shopmonroemall.com    Northlake Mall    6801 Northlake Mall Drive     Charlotte, NC 28216     704-921-2005     www.shopnorthlake.com    Phillips Place                      Cameron Valley Parkway at     Fariview Rd    Charlotte, NC 28210 www.phillipsplace.com       Prime Outlets-Gaffney    1 Factory Shops Boulevard    Gaffney, SC 29341    888-545-7194    www.primeoutlets.com   Rock Hill Galleria    2301 Dave Lyle Boulevard    Rock Hill, SC 29730    803-324-1711    www.rockhillgalleria.com    South Park Mall    4400 Sharon Road    Charlotte, NC 28211    704-364-4411    www.southpark.com    Shoppes at University Place     8929 J.M. Keynes Drive    Charlotte, NC 28262    704-549-4811   www.shoppesatuniversityplace.com Specialty Shops on the Park    Morrison Boulevard at    Roxborough Rd    Charlotte, NC     Westfield Eastridge Mall    246 N. New Hope Road    Gastonia, NC 28054    704-867-1847    www.westfield.com/eastridge     704-896-5141 Office   Allen Tate Company  www.LeeAnnMiller.com

Shopping Around Charlotte

Love to shop? You will find yourself at home in Charlotte. With everything from upscale to antique to bargain shopping, Charlotte is continuously expanding its retail space and drawing shoppers from across the region. Whether you’re looking for a Louis Vuitton handbag, unique Victorian jewelry or just a good deal on a new suit, Charlotte has what you’re looking for. The most exclusive mall in Charlotte is Southpark at the corner of Sharon and Fairview  roads. Anchored by Hecht’s, Nordstrom, Dillard’s, Belk and the latest edition, Neiman Marcus. Southpark houses numerous specialty shops and several high-end retailers including Burberry, Kate Spade and Louis Vuitton. Other posh shopping centers in the area include Specialty Shops on the Park behind Southpark mall and Phillips Place on Fairview Road, characterized by cobblestone walkways, upscale restaurants, galleries, jewelers and a salon. Concord Mills, opened in 1999, draws mall enthusiasts from across the region to its 1.4 million square feet of shopping and entertainment. Packed with a number of outlet stores like Polo Ralph Lauren, Nike, Osh Kosh B’Gosh, Saks Fifth  Avenue and Ann Taylor, Concord Mills boasts more than 200 stores, a 24 –screen movie theater, restaurants and Dave and Buster’s with a dance club, hibachi grill, four bars, billiards and a bowling alley. Located about a mile from Lowe’s Motor Speedway, Concord Mills also draws visitors to its NASCAR SpeedPark, which features six race tracks, miniature golf, kiddie rides, laser tag, an arcade and a rock climbing wall. About 15.3 million people flock to Concord Mills each year, making it the top tourist attraction in the state. The University area is bursting with shopping centers, but none a aesthetic as the Shoppes at University Place off W.T. Harris Boulevard. Set around a small lake, the Shoppes at University Place also includes a two-mile walking trail. In addition to big-box retailers Wal-Mart, Best Buy and Dick’s Sporting Goods, the Shoppes at University Place are home to more than 80 stores and restaurants, many of which offer a spectacular view of the lake. The Mooresville area is exploding with shopping areas. Most are anchored by a big box store, such as, Super Wal-Mart, Lowe’s, Super Target, Khols, Belk or Best Buy and surrounded by specialty shops that include World Market, Ross, Pier One, Old Navy & Pet Smart to name a few.  You will also enjoy the vast variety of restaurants & race shops. Birkdale Village, a mixed-use development of shops, apartments, restaurants and offices, occupies more than 700,000 square feet in Huntersville. With an old-time Main Street and park benches, Birkdale Village includes a Banana Republic, Gymboree, Gap, American Eagle, Barnes & Noble, Williams-Sonoma, Pier 1, salons and a 16 screen movie theater. In fall of 2005, Northlake Mall opened to much fanfare at the intersection of I-77 and W.T. Harris, serving North Mecklenburg and the booming Lake Norman area. With more than 150 shops and restaurants, the new mall is anchored by Belk, Dillard’s, Hecht’s, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Borders and a 14-screen movie theater. In Pineville, Carolina Place Mall is extremely popular, drawing South Charlotteans to its more than 140 specialty shops that include American Eagle, Ann Taylor, Abercrombie & Fitch and Gap. Near the I-485/NC 51 interchange, Carolina Place is anchored by Dillard’s, Hecht’s, Belk, JCPenny and Sears. Across NC51, the Centrum offers big-box retailers Best Buy and Home Depot. Just up I-485 at NC 49, Ayrsley is a new mixed-use development of retail, office and residential space with specialty shops and restaurants. Nearby, Whitehall Commons is a new shopping center with 585,000 square feet that includes Super Wal-Mart and Lowe’s. Distinctive shops are popping up all over Charlotte’s historic mill villages, Southendand NoDa. Known for their galleries and renovated mills, both areas offer unique clothing stores and restaurants. Antique lovers will also enjoy the Metrolina Expo, a trade center that hosts a monthly Antique & Collectible Show, which attracts avid collectors from across the Southeast. A number of shopping centers outside of Charlotte also provide excellent shopping ventures. Westfield Eastridge Mall in Gastonia is anchored by Dillard’s, JCPenny, Sears and Belk and includes more than 75 specialty stores. About 45 minutes southwest of Charlotte via I-85, the Prime Outlets in Gaffney, features more than 80 outlet stores including Banana Republic, Polo Ralph Lauren, Bass, Pottery Barn, Nautica, Nine West and Jones New York. Because of its abundance of manufacturers, North Carolina is one of the best places in the country to buy furniture. About an hour from Charlotte, the Hickory Furniture Mart in Hickory offers domestic and imported furniture and home furnishings from more than 100 factory stores, outlets and galleries, and features more than 1,000 lines.

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 Allen Tate Company

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Charlotte, NC-South Charlotte

South Charlotte is home to some of the region’s most desirable neighborhoods as well as shopping venues galore. In addition, two of Mecklenburg’s most historic towns Matthews and  blend seamlessly with the city’s southern edge. The two major destinations for living, shopping and working on the south side of town are SouthPark and Ballantyne. SouthPark was once part of a 3,000-acre farm owned by former N.C. Governor Cameron Morrison. The farms main house, the Tudor Revival style Morrocroft Mansion, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. South Park A prestigious address, SouthPark offers a variety of housing styles, ranging from the 1950s ranch houses of Beverly Woods to newly-built town homes and million-dollar mansions in the gated Morrocroft community. SouthPark is a major business district, second only to Uptown. Contemporary glass and marble buildings are home to many major Charlotte businesses. The area also boasts several fine hotels. SouthPark shopping is unmatched in the city. SouthPark Mall, Charlotte’s most upscale shopping center, includes major department stores and shops such as Tiffany, Louis Vuitton, Brooks Brothers and Pottery Barn. The malls newest additions include Nordstrom and Neiman Marcus. Additionally, an amphitheater on the property hosts the Charlotte Symphony’s Summer Pops concerts. Just down the street, pedestrian-friendly Phillips Place features high-end specialty shops, restaurants, movie theaters and luxury apartments. Sharon Corners and Specialty Shops on the Park offer local and national retail shops as well as restaurants. Ballantyne Ballantyne is a new live-work community encompassing 2,000 acres south of I-485. The Corporate Park includes office buildings, a resort hotel, an 18-hole daily-fee golf course and the nationally renowned Dana Rader School of Golf. Residential options include several apartment communities and neighborhoods with single-family homes in nearly every price range. Ballantyne Country Club features custom homes and a private, 18-hole golf course. The town center has shops, restaurants and a YMCA. Ballantyne also boasts several new public schools. Other South Charlotte Neighborhoods South Charlotte also offers other living and shopping options. The Cotswold area offers easy access to Uptown and is known for its lovely, older neighborhoods and newly renovated shopping center. Along Park Road are several charming neighborhoods dating back to the 1950s, including Madison Park, which features brick ranches and tall trees. Nearby Park Road Shopping Center is a Charlotte landmark with the popular Blackhawk Hardware, the independent bookstore Park Road Books and Sir Edmund Halley’s, an English-style tavern with a lovely patio. Dozens of neighborhoods in a variety of price ranges are accessible from N.C. 51, as are countless shopping venues, including the Arboretum at Providence Road. In addition to a wide variety of churches, from modern Calvary Church to historic Providence Presbyterian, South Charlotte is also home to Shalom Park. The center of Charlotte’s Jewish community, Shalom Park includes two synagogues and the Jewish Community Center. Recreation South Charlotte also offers a variety of recreational opportunities. SouthPark’s Harris YMCA and the Siskey YMCA in Matthews are family favorites. For nature walks, try one of the greenways. The McMullen Creek and Lower McAlpine Greenway feature four miles of trail and a picnic area. McAlpine Creek Greenway has 8.9 miles of greenway, cross country trails and nature trails. The planned Little Sugar Creek Greenway will run 15 miles from North Charlotte to Pineville, right through the heart of South Charlotte. This area also has several parks with lakes, athletic fields, playgrounds and trails. Pineville Pineville, Mecklenburg’s smallest town, is the birthplace of America’s 11th president, James K. Polk. The town is proud of its success in preserving its historic downtown, where dozens of antique shops line Main Street (N.C. 51). At the same time, Pineville has embraced growth in the surrounding areas, including several hotels, shopping centers, senior residences and a thriving medical community surrounding Carolinas Medical Center-Pineville. Although it rests on the S.C. border, Pineville will feel much closer to Charlotte when the town is connected to Uptown by light rail, expected to be completed in 2007. Matthews To the east on N.C. 51 is Matthews, another picturesque town that embraces its past and future simultaneously. A mixed-use development downtown houses a new town hall, library, shops, restaurants and offices, all in keeping with the towns historical aesthetics. Just outside downtown are huge shopping complexes, restaurants, offices and Presbyterian Hospital-Matthews. In addition to the commercial development, Matthews is seeing tremendous residential growth as new communities are cropping up everywhere. Matthews is known for its community events such as Stumptown Park summer concert and movie series; Picnic on the Green, a local summer farmers market; Fourth of July parade and fall ArtFest. Its Matthews Alive! Festival gathers more than 100,000 people each Labor Day weekend for food, fun and music.                                                                                                                        704-896-5141 Office                                                       www.LeeAnnMiller.com                                                         Allen Tate Company

Charlotte,NC-East Charlotte

East of Uptown, Charlotte is home to a wide collection of neighborhoodssome new and some established. All have a distinct “laid-back” atmosphere that hints of rural life; but they are without a doubt part of metro Charlotte. To catch a look at how people in these parts lived some 200 years ago, visit the Charlotte Museum of History and the Hezekiah Alexander Homesite, Mecklenburg’s oldest surviving structure. Take in the 18th-century-style house, kitchen and springhouse and then visit the museum for permanent and touring exhibits. The wooded grounds are a lovely respite from city life. The site is also home to the worlds largest ground-level bell, the 7-ton and seven-by-seven foot American Freedom Bell, which is nestled in a lovely setting on the property on Shamrock Drive. East Charlotte is home to some of the city’s most affordable housing, which makes it an especially good spot for first-time buyers and people who want value and good prices. The area also boasts several large apartment and town home communities.

Shopping

Central Avenue/Albemarle Road and East Independence Boulevard are two of Charlottes busiest commercial districts, with loads of stores and the traffic to go along with them. Independence Boulevard is home to a sprawling collection of auto dealers, big-box stores and strip shopping centers. Charlotte-Mecklenburg is planning a transit system for the Southeast Corridor which will run along Independence Boulevard from Charlotte to Matthews. Eastland Mall, which sits on Central Avenue between Sharon Amity and Albemarle roads, draws shoppers from around the region to its healthy assortment of national chain specialty stores, anchors and a food court. The 1.1-million-square-foot, double-decker center also is one of the coolest places in town, thanks to the Ice House, an ice-skating rink in the center of the mall. Shoppers who want to take a break can watch from the balconies overhead or rent a pair of skates for a spin on the ice. Diversity A trend that’s shaping East Charlotte is the influx of immigrants and new citizens who make their homes in this family-friendly area. Here’s where you’ll find the Hindu Center, the Islamic Center, the Chinese Baptist Church and a host of other facilities, as well as many ethnic groceries and specialty stores. Perhaps because of this, East Charlotte also has developed an eclectic selection of restaurants, including Italian, Chinese, Thai, Mexican, Vietnamese, steakhouses, family restaurants and cafeterias. Recreation If you want to get outdoors, check out Reedy Creek Park and Nature Preserve on Rocky River Road. It features 727 acres of nature trails, recreational fields, a disc golf course, fishing ponds, picnic areas and an Environmental Center, with hands-on nature exhibits and a butterfly garden. Golfers will enjoy teeing off at a number of public and semi-private golf courses, including the Charles T. Myers course on Harrisburg Road. Mint Hill For a city that combines country atmosphere with city convenience, take a look at Mint Hill. It was incorporated in 1971, but the city traces its history back to Scotch-Irish settlers in the mid-1700s. The town’s proximity to Union County and some well-executed plans requiring large home sites contribute to the cozy feel. The intersection of N.C. 51 (Matthews-Mint Hill Road) and Lawyers Road is the towns center, with shopping areas and town offices. Youll also find a few manufacturing companies and business parks nearby. For recreation, visit Mint Hill’s 55-acre Fairview Park, which includes an asphalt track for walking, bicycling or in-line skating, a disc golf course, nature trail, playground, racquetball and tennis courts, ball fields and a full concession stand. Folks who want more peace and quiet enjoy the meditation garden at St. Luke Catholic Church on Lawyers Road and the Mint Hill branch of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg public library, a 12,000-square-foot facility that has a loyal following.                                                                                                                           704-896-5141 Office                                                         www.LeeAnnMiller.com                                                            Allen Tate Company

Charlotte, NC- Historic Charlotte

Charlotte’s oldest and most scenic neighborhoods form a crescent around the Center City. These “streetcar suburbs” date back to before the turn of the century and feature homes ranging from tiny bungalows to grand Georgian mansions, with new construction sprinkled throughout. Dilworth, Charlotte’s oldest suburb, was developed in the 1890s. A “front porch” community, Dilworth’s homes are primarily lovingly restored bungalows of the Craftsman style. A stroll down its avenues will take you back in time. East Boulevard, at Dilworth’s center, is lined with local restaurants and businesses. Freedom Park, well known for its annual arts festival, “Festival in The Park”, is at the eastern end of the boulevard. Carolinas Medical Center, a 777-bed teaching hospital and the region’s only Level-1 trauma center, sits a block off East Boulevard. One of Charlotte’s hottest communities, South End, is on Dilworth’s western edge. Its refurbished textile mills provide interesting venues for restaurants, shops and office lofts, making it a trendy locale. New residential options complement the booming commercial development. The Charlotte Trolley is a popular ride with Carolina Panther fans who walk to Bank of America Stadium from the Stonewall Street stop. In 2004, the trolley will transport riders from South End through uptown, as it did 100 years ago. Myers Park is the neighborhood of choice for those who value tradition over trend. The one-time “country” neighborhood is now a mere five minutes’ drive from downtown Charlotte. But the setting remains idyllic, as even the largest of its classic homes are dwarfed by towering willow oaks. Among the older, traditional houses, you’ll find a number of newer mansions and infill projects. Myers Park homes carry a steep price tag due to the neighborhood’s unwavering desirability. Queens College, a small liberal arts school, has been a member of the Myers Park community since 1914, when it moved to its Selwyn Avenue campus. The college offers both undergraduate and graduate degrees. The Eastover community emerged shortly after Myers Park and features majestic homes set back from winding streets on expansive lawns. Like Myers Park, Eastover’s original homes are interspersed with grandiose new homes. In 1936, the Mint Museum of Art opened in Eastover in the building that once housed Charlotte’s original U.S. Mint. However, the museum may leave Eastover for the Center City in a few years Elizabeth is an historic community where residents enjoy an urban lifestyle. In this designated historic district with strict renovation guidelines, the architecturally diverse homes still have much of their original character and charm. The compact neighborhood includes several popular restaurants and shops. The intersection of Randolph Road and Caswell Avenue is a medical crossroads. Presbyterian Hospital, Presbyterian Orthopedic Hospital, Mercy Hospital and numerous medical offices are located at or near the intersection. The main campus of Central Piedmont Community College, the state’s largest community college, is also in Elizabeth. Another neighborhood popular among young professionals who want to live in the shadows of uptown is Chantilly. Chantilly features beautiful narrow streets with charming cottages. Though not yet as expensive as Elizabeth and Dilworth, prices are climbing rapidly. Chantilly’s neighbor, Plaza-Midwood, traces its development back to 1903 and boasts a diverse population and variety of home styles. This is one of Charlotte’s few historic neighborhoods where you still find small, affordable homes around the corner from expensive, stately residences. Central Avenue and The Plaza are the community’s main arteries. Central Avenue is enjoying a rebirth, with new restaurants and entertainment venues that make it a popular evening destination. Along The Plaza, a traditional boulevard, you’ll find elegant old homes, including the historic Van Landingham Estate. Nearby, grand homes dating back to 1920 line Country Club’s quiet, curving streets. The small community is named for its centerpiece, Charlotte Country Club, the city’s oldest country club. Head out North Davidson Street to 35th Street to reach Historic North Davidson, known for its funky galleries, colorful “shotgun” homes and popular apartments in the renovated Johnston Mill. “NoDa” is a regular destination for gallery crawls, drawing people from all over town.                                                                                                                     704-896-5141 Office                                                     www.LeeAnnMiller.com                                                          Allen Tate Company

6 Tips To Help Your Home Attract Buyers

The goal is to get buyers to walk-in & feel like they are at home. This helps them visualize themselves living in your home and makes them want to buy your home because they are emotionally attached! 1) Neturalize! Yes, it sounds boring but by neutralizing your home you are helping buyers envision themselves & their belongings in, what could be, their new home. Plus, your home becomes more “move in ready” compared to your compettion. Keep in mind that some colors make rooms appear smaller than they really are. Not good when you are wanting to attract buyers! 2) Make It Shine! A clean home is a happy home. Dust regularly, empty all trash cans, wipe off countertops, wash windows, vacuum, clean carpets, wipe off blinds & wash baseboards. The more shine equals the more time a buyer may stay in your home. 3) Conceal Clutter Clear surfaces help buyers visually place their personal items in your home. A few stylish items are fine but should not devert any attention away from that surface. Notice show homes, the countertops are free from clutter to help you remember the granite or the custom cabinets. Aslo, turn rooms back to what they attended to be. For instance, if the living room has been taken over by toys-turn it back into the living room & find a new home for toys. 4) What’s That Smell? Smells can make or break your home. Try to conceal or completely remove pet beds, feeding bowls & litter boxes, if possible. Stick to the more pleasant smells of fresh baked cookies or flowers. Also, try to avoid cooking fish or cabbage. You don’t want buyers to be turned off the minute they step through the front door. And if you have to smoke, please do it outside–oh & hide the ashtrays! The purpose is to sell your home. You don’t want potential buyers to remember your home because of an unpleasant smell!  5) Less Is More! Clear out those closets. Again, look at a show home or closet brochure, hanging only a few items makes the closet look larger!  6) Crub Appeal Freshen up your landscaping. Keep your yard & hedges neatly trimmed. Keep sidewalks swept & tidy.  For a  warm welcome, add flowering plants to the front porch or a cozy chair. A great first impression is the key! Some buyers may cancel showings if the grass is tall or hedges are sloppy.

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704-896-5141 Office

www.LeeAnnMiller.com

Allen Tate Company